An irreducible Queen of innovation disappears with Elizabeth II

Here's how in the seventy years, 7 months and 2 days of reign the British sovereign has promptly embraced every innovation in technology

A recent portrait of Elizabeth II processed by an artificial intelligence algorithm
A recent portrait of Elizabeth II processed by an artificial intelligence algorithm

Although in the DNA of a monarchy, and especially of any monarchical institutional system, there is by definition respect and respect for tradition, and in the British one much more than others, the death of Elizabeth II on 8 September 2022 deprives the United Kingdom , the Commonwealth and the rest of the world of an extraordinary Queen of innovation and new technologies.
During her seventy years, 7 months and 2 days of reign, the time that has elapsed since the accession to the throne of St. George on February 6, 1952, the British sovereign embodied a remarkable example of serene ability to adapt retrospectively or even to anticipate the innovations that science and research were capable of generating.

Queen Elizabeth II in contact with a small robot during a visit to Berlin
Queen Elizabeth II in contact with a small robot during a visit to Berlin

In communication, one step ahead of the rest of the world

Her reign was the longest in all of British history, having surpassed the previous record on 9 September 2015, held by the great-great-grandmother Victoria of Hanover, of 63 years, 7 months and 2 days, and is the longest ever for a female monarch, but it was a life itinerary in which progress has always dominated.
How the Royal Palace (be it Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Saint James's Palace or Holyrood Palace as official residences or Sandringham House or Balmoral Castle as private residences) connects with the rest of the planet has changed so much in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
This happened thanks to the continuous evolution of the Internet and telecommunications technology, but Elizabeth II never gave up the principles of innovation to relate to her subjects.

Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret's radio broadcast for wartime children in 1940
Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret's radio broadcast for wartime children in 1940

First radio broadcast at the age of fourteen in 1940

In 1940 the Queen, then Princess Elizabeth, spoke to Commonwealth children during a BBC broadcast, Children's Hour, with her sister Margaret by her side, reassuring the beardless listeners, many of whom had been evacuated due to the outbreak of the World War II, that “everything would be fine”, that the serene would return as soon as possible in the skies of the world.
The radio broadcast reached audiences throughout the United Kingdom, as well as those of Australia and New Zealand, Canada and Newfoundland, where many English, Scottish and Welsh subjects had been sent at an early age for their safety.
The transmission of the young heir to the throne, then just XNUMX, is believed to have even helped to encourage other nations to join the war effort of allied countries.
Just as her father George VII regularly hosted radio broadcasts after overcoming his stuttering problems, Elizabeth II Windsor embraced any innovation that helped her get even closer to the people she ruled.

That unprecedented 1953 televised coronation for the Windsors

Queen Elizabeth's coronation on 14 June 1953 in Westminster Abbey was the first to be televised and was watched by twenty-seven million people in the UK and half a billion men and women worldwide.
It was the first proclamation of a ruler on live TV in history.

In 1957 the first Christmas greetings to the English people on live TV

The Queen's Christmas greetings and speech were broadcast for the first time on television with her in 1957.
“The fact that some of you can see me today is just yet another example of how fast things are changing around us”, said Elizabeth II in the speech. It was three in the afternoon on December 25th.

Queen Elizabeth II when sending the first email in 1976
Queen Elizabeth II when sending the first email in 1976

Sending an innovative email message in 1976

The Queen sent the first email long before most other sovereigns and other public figures around the world. Though she's a bit of a latecomer to social media, Elizabeth II Windsor was particularly early in adopting email.
When the ARPANET, which later became the Internet, was set up in a military telecommunications research center called the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, the Queen was one of the first people in the world to send an email in 1976.
Peter Kirstein, who helped her send the message from Malvern, later stated that the username he set up for the sovereign was HME2, short for “Her Majesty, Elizabeth II”.

The announcement of Queen Elizabeth II's death on 8 September 2022 on the Royal Family website
The announcement of Queen Elizabeth II's death on 8 September 2022 on the Royal Family website

In 1997 the activation of the official website www.royal.gov.uk

In 1997, Elizabeth II authorized the activation of the Royal Family website at the URL domain www.royal.gov.uk, the updated version of which would arrive twelve years later with the address shortened to royal.uk.

An extract from the 2005 Queen's Christmas Speech released in the form of a Podcast
An extract from the 2005 Queen's Christmas Speech released in the form of a Podcast

Also on podcast in 2006 His Majesty's Christmas greetings

A further technological innovation for the Christmas message occurred in 2006, when the Queen recorded the first podcast with her own voice.

Since 2007 landing on the main social networks and media

Since 2007, the British Royal Family has gradually landed on the main international social networks and social media, starting with YouTube. Twitter would follow in 2009, Facebook and Flickr the following year, followed by Instagram in 2013.

In 2008, the visit to the Google headquarters and the first YouTube video

In 2008, the Queen visited Google's headquarters in London and the Royal Family even shared a video of the day on their official YouTube page, then a very fresh aggregator of videos of various kinds.
Whilst on site, Elizabeth II and Prince Philip of Edinburgh were shown a viral video of a child giggling which also caused general hilarity in the Queen and Prince Consort, immortalized in the YouTube footage.

The broadcast of Queen Elizabeth II's first 3D Christmas greetings in 2012
The broadcast of Queen Elizabeth II's first 3D Christmas greetings in 2012

The first annual three-dimensional Christmas message in 2012

In 2012, Elizabeth II recorded her annual Christmas message for the Commonwealth for the first time in 3D.
Every year, the Queen records a video commentary on the past year and good wishes for the future one and on one occasion she decided of her own free will to change the protocol.
According to a Buckingham Palace spokesman who later told the BBC about it, the Queen thought it was “absolutely beautiful”.

In 2014 an inaugural tweet from the Science Museum in London

The Queen is not only an "email expert", as she was able to demonstrate back in 1976, but also of the Twitter channel.
He sent the first tweet, during a visit to the Science Museum in London, in a message that immediately got 36.000 likes.
“It's a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibit at the @ScienceMuseum today and I hope people enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R”, he wrote on the occasion on October 24, 2014

 

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A letter to Prince Albert for an Instagram post in 2019

In March 2019, the Queen first posted to the Royal Family's Instagram account, again during a visit to London's Science Museum.
He did so by choosing to share a photo of a letter hanging on one wall of the exhibition and written to his great-grandfather, Prince Albert, by the English computer pioneer Charles Babbage.
“Today I had the pleasure of learning about children's own coding computer initiatives and it seems fitting to post this Instagram post from the Science Museum, which has long championed technology, innovation and inspiring the next generation of inventors”, wrote His Majesty on the occasion of the visit.

The first video conference attended by Elizabeth II in May 2020
The first video conference attended by Elizabeth II in May 2020

By video conferencing in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic

In June 2020, at the age of 94, Queen Elizabeth II used Zoom to hold the first public videoconference.
The Queen joined her daughter, Princess Anne, on a Carers Week video call to express her gratitude to leading medical and nursing industry representatives and hear about their experiences during the pandemic.
His were over seventy years of reign and over ninety-six of life in the sign of constant innovation…

Princess Elizabeth of Kent just weeks old in May 1926
Princess Elizabeth of Kent just weeks old in May 1926