The first 127-qubit quantum processor is made-by-IBM

The first 127-qubit quantum processor is made-by-IBM

The number of classic bits to represent a state of "Eagle" exceeds that of atoms that make up the ... 7,5 billion people in the world

“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021
“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021

On the occasion of the "Quantum Summit 2021”, the annual event dedicated to milestones ofhardware and quantum software and to the development of related ecosystem, IBM announced the birth of "Eagle", the first quantum processor from 127 qubits (quantum bits).
The processor "Eagle" represents a further step forward in tapping into thehuge computing potential of devices based on quantum physics.
The time is approaching hardware development in which quantum circuits will not be able to be simulated exactly reliably from today's computers.
IBM also previewed plans for IBM Quantum System Two, the new generation of quantum systems.
Quantum computing draws on the fundamental quantum nature of matter a subatomic levels, to offer the possibility of a enormous computing power.
THEcomputational unit foundation of quantum computing is the quantum circuitor, one arrangement of qubits in quantum gates and measurements. The more qubits it has a quantum processor, the more complex and valuable are the quantum circuits which it can perform.

Experimental breakthrough towards quantum supercomputers

“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021
“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021

Quantum Advantage is now a tangible reality

IBM recently unveiled a detailed roadmap for the quantum computing, including a scalable growth path of thequantum hardware to allow the quantum circuits to reach the QuantumAdvantage, the point at which quantum systems can significantly surpass the classical systems.
"Eagle" is the most recent step along this one scalability path.
IBM measures i advances in quantum computing hardware through three performance attributes: Scalability, Quality e Speed.
La scalability is measured in number of qubits on a quantum processor and determines quantum of a quantum circuit can be performed.
Quality is measured by Quantum Volume and describes the precision with which i quantum circuits are performed on a real quantum device.

 

The process of building “Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, presented by IBM in November 2021
The process of building “Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, presented by IBM in November 2021

Measurements with CLOPS, Circuit Layer Operations per Second

Speed ​​is measured by CLOP extension (Circuit Layer Operations Per Second), a metric introduced by IBM in November 2021, which determines the feasibility of perform real calculations composed of a large number of quantum circuits.
"Eagle" is the IBM's first quantum processor developed and distributed to contain more than 100 qubits operational and connected. It follows the IBM processor “Hummingbird", from 65 qubits, presented in 2020, and the processor "Falcon", from 27 qubits, presented in 2019.
To reach this turning point, IBM researchers they are based on proven innovations under the existing quantum processorsi, as a design of arrangement of qubits to reduce errors and an architecture for reduce the number of components necessary.

The lesson of the OVH case: planning for Business Continuity

“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021
“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021

The control wiring is on multiple physical layers in the processor

Le new techniques exploited within "Eagle" place the control wiring on multiple physical levels inside the processor keeping qubits on a single layer, which allows for a significant increase in qubits.
Increasing the number of qubits will allow users to explore problems to a new level of complexity when they undertake experiments and run applications, such as machine learning optimization or the modeling of new molecules and materials for use in industries ranging fromenergy industry to the discovery process new drugs.

Impossible a simulation by a classical computer

“Eagle” is the IBM's first quantum processor whose scale makes impossible to simulate trusted by a classic computer.
In fact, the number of classical bits needed to represent a state on processor a 127 qubits exceeds the total number of atoms of which they are composed over 7,5 billion people in the world.
“The arrival of the 'Eagle' processor represents an important step towards the day when quantum computers can surpass classical computers for useful applications”Said Dario Gil, Director of IBM Research.
“Quantum computing has the power to transform nearly every industry and help us address the biggest problems of our time. This is why IBM continues to rapidly innovate quantum hardware and software design, creating ways of execution that enable quantum and classical workloads to augment each other and create a global ecosystem, imperative for the growth of a 'quantum industry'.
The first processor "Eagle" is available as exploration device su IBM Cloud for some selected members of theIBM Quantum Network.

The Bologna Technopole at the heart of the digital revolution

“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021
“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021

A new partnership with Yonsei University in Seoul

In 2019, IBM presented Quantum System One, the first system of integrated quantum computing in the world. Since then, the International Business Machines Corporation made these systems available as services IBM Quantum, cloud-based, in the United States, as well as in Germany for Fraunhofer-gesellschaft, the leading German scientific research institute, in Japan is preferably used for University of Tokyo, and again in the USA to the Cleveland Clinic.
Furthermore, a new partnership has been announced with theYonsei University of Seoul, South Korea, to implement the IBM's first quantum system in the Asian country.
La multinational of Armonk of continues inadvancement of these processors and are expected to mature beyond the infrastructure of Quantum System One. Therefore, it will be IBM Quantum System Two, designed to work with i future IBM processors a 433 qubits e 1.121 qubits, to make a difference.
“IBM Quantum System Two offers a glimpse into the future of quantum computing data centers, where system infrastructure modularity and flexibility will be the key to continued scalability”, said the doctor Jay Gambetta, IBM Fellow and VP for the Quantum Computing.
“System Two draws on IBM's long heritage in both quantum and classical computing, innovating at every level of the technology stack.”

Yonsei University is a private, coeducational university located in the city of Seoul, the capital of South Korea
Yonsei University is a private, coeducational university located in the city of Seoul, the capital of South Korea

Hardware flexibility and resources are vital to be able to scale

Central for IBM Quantum System Two is the concept of modularity. As theInternational Business Machines Corporation progresses along the its hardware roadmap and builds processors with a largest number of qubits, it is vital that thecontrol hardware has the flexibility and resources to scale.
These resources include thecontrol electronics, which allows users to manipulate qubits, and the cryogenic cooling, which keeps the qubits at one quite low temperature to allow their quantum properties to manifest themselves.
The design of IBM Quantum System Two will incorporate a new generation di control electronics scalable of qubits together with cryogenic components and wiring at higher density.

Automated driving and shared mobility are worth 25 billion

New cryogenic platform, in collaboration with Bluefors

Furthermore, IBM Quantum System Two introduces one new cryogenic platform, designed in collaboration with Blueforsa innovative structural design to maximize it space for supporting hardware, requested by bigger processorswhile ensuring that engineers can access them easily and do hardware maintenance.
Furthermore, the new design offers the possibility to provide a plus large space di shared cryogenic work, finally leading to the potential hookup di più quantum processors. The prototype IBM Quantum System Two should be operational 2023.

“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021
“Eagle”, the first 127-qubit quantum processor, was unveiled by IBM in November 2021